Tuesday, July 3, 2018

The Author Explains His Poem, Freedom, a Poem of leaving Darkness

The poem, FREEDOM, is one of my most sincere poems in the book, Beyond These Dark Lands Are Edges of Joy. You can download a PDF of the book at the link below.

TITLE
The full title is FREEDOM, A Poem of Leaving Darkness. There are many poems about freedom. In this poem, freedom comes from forgiveness.

The second part of the title is the important part. We are in a darkness that enslaves us. The title gives us hope that we can leave the darkness and become free.

STRUCTURE
This poem is 26 lines long forming seven sentences. The majority of the poems in this collection are written in the third person; but in this one, I use the first person to tell the story of the reader.
"I see you oppressed
And driven through darkness..."
Illustration for the Poem Freedom,
From the book Beyond These Dark Lands
Are Edges of Joy,
By A.E. Dozat © 2018
and
"...What you are seeking
I would give freely."

Each line is five syllables long, so it has some structure.

OUTLINE
The first five lines describe the searching oppressed reader who seeks freedom. 
Lines six through thirteen describe the speaker's reaction to the one who is seeking freedom. 
Lines 14 through the end are a testimony of having found freedom and the supernatural response to share it with others. 

MEANING
The meaning of this poem is that though you are in darkness and troubled with guilt, but you can hope because freedom from your guilt is available. It says that others have found freedom through Christ and you may find it too.

This poem is one of the places where the book becomes personal, here I, as the author, speaks directly to the reader. It is a poem of hope and goodwill. It makes clear that Christ forgiveness is hope for the lost.

This poem is illustrated with a pen drawing of a dark, narrow ravine and a path that leads to the open space.

SCRIPTURE
The bottom of the page has a verse of scripture from the epistle of the Colossians. ”For he has rescued us from the dominion of darkness and brought us into the kingdom of the Son He loves, in Whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.” Colossians 1:13-14, NIV.

This poem tells you that there is hope and you can find freedom from all your inner darkness.


Beyond These Dark Lands
Are Edges of Joy,
Words of Comfort and Hope
Poems by A.E. Dozat © 2018
If you are in need of encouragement or know someone who does you should order a copy today, you will glad you did. 

Use the Buy Now button for quick check out

$9.62 Plus $4.17 Basic Shipping


For digital downloads CLICK HERE, $2.99.

To find out more and read a sample poem visit my website, A.E. Dozat.com.
To read a review CLICK HERE.

© Adron 7/3/18

Saturday, June 23, 2018

The Author Explains His Poem, Not Only Are You Known, A Poem about God

My poem, Not Only Are You Known, is a poem of great encouragement. It is from my book of poems, Beyond These Dark Lands Are Edges Of Joy, Words of Comfort and Hope. This is a book that will uplift and encourage someone who is going through difficult times.

TITLE
I chose this title because I wanted to cause a little curiosity about God's knowledge of you. Of course, as an all-knowing God, he knows your existence, but I want to prompt that there is more to it than that. Yes, God knows you, but that is only the beginning.

STRUCTURE
The simplicity of this poem makes it beautiful. It is only four sentences, and the sentences are broken up into 22 lines. Most of the lines are three, four, or five syllables with a few being six. The praise, "God knows you," is repeated six times each time expressing the depth of His knowledge of you. For example the first is,
God knows you
With all your flaws,
And He accepts you.

Illustration for the poem,
Not Only Are You Known,
From the book,
Beyond These Dark Lands Are Edges of Joy
© A.E. Dozat 2018
Each of these "God knows you" statements reaffirms God's love and acceptance of you. In lines 13 - 22 the poem leaps to the ultimate affirmation of God's love where He knows we needed a savior and He provided one. 

MESSAGE
On the surface, this appears to be about how God knows you with all your imperfections; but it concludes by saying that God knew that you needed a savior and sent Christ to be our salvation. The poem assures the reader that although God knows your failings, He still desires to have a relationship with you.

ILLUSTRATION
Illustrations of a road unite the poems of this book. For this poem, I drew a cross beside a mountain road to emphasize The Savior who died to pay for our sins.

This poem is for a person who feels that they could never come to God because they are too evil, or have committed some unforgivable sin. This poem helps them to see that God knows their failings and still sent His son to become their Savior. No matter how far you are from God remember that Christ is still the way back.

THE SCRIPTURE REFERENCE
And we have seen and testify that the Father has sent His Son to be the Savior of the world. 1 John 4:14, NIV

Beyond These Dark Lands
Are Edges of Joy,
Words of Comfort and Hope
Poems by A.E. Dozat © 2018
If you are in need of encouragement or know someone who does you should order a copy today, you will glad you did. 

Use the Buy Now button for quick check out

$9.62 Plus $4.17 Basic Shipping


For digital downloads CLICK HERE, $2.99.

To find out more and read a sample poem visit my website, A.E. Dozat.com.

To read a review CLICK HERE.

© Adron 6/23/18

Thursday, June 7, 2018

The Poet Explains His Poem Freedom, a Poem of Leaving Darkness.

Freedom is a poem from my book, Beyond These Dark Lands Are Edges Of Joy, Words of Comfort and Hope. When you read it you start to understand that forgiveness is possible.

TITLE
The full title of this poem is Freedom, a Poem of Leaving Darkness; it suggests freedom will be found when you leave the place of darkness. Darkness may be anything but this poem applies to the specific enslavement of guilt, and the darkness we carry inside.

STRUCTURE
This poem is 27 lines long and most lines are five syllables. At first, it looks like free-verse. It is one of the rare poems in this collection that uses the first person singular of  "I."The I starts a new section of the poem four times.
  • Lines 1 through 6 is the "I see you oppressed..." section, where the poem opens up with the observation of the readers struggle with guilt and darkness. 
  • Lines 7-13 are the "I would give freely..." where the poem moves to compassion, but with the suggestion that there is a solution to be received. 
  • Lines 14-17 is the "I, too, needed..." and "I have found..." section of confession and admission. The "I have found..." is repeated in line 18, I prefer to avoid repeats because they generally weaken a message. I made the exception to satisfy the question of what was found. 
  • Illustration for Freedom
    A poem of Leaving Darkness
    © A.E. Dozat 2018 
  • The last 9 lines are a declaration of having found freedom from darkness and guilt. The last line of the poem is simple but after you think about you see more than what is on the surface. 
In these posts, I try not to give away too much since I want to sell the book but here is the ending.
This pardon 
He gives
Is so wonderful 
That I would have it 
Overflow to you.

MEANING
I wrote this poem because I know a lot of people struggle with guilt. Guilt is a darkness in our souls that we can't get rid of no matter what we do. I offer the solution that through Christ the Father offers forgiveness because of Christ's sacrifice on our behalf.

ILLUSTRATION.
This poem is illustrated with a drawing of a dark deep valley with a rocky path.  Beyond the valley, the path enters distant pleasant lands.

The scripture at footnote for the poem is ”For he has rescued us from the dominion of darkness and brought us into the kingdom of the Son He loves, in Whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.” Colossians 1:13-14, NIV

This poem offers hope that if you are struggling with guilt that there is forgiveness for you if you receive it from Christ who gives it freely.

Beyond These Dark Lands
Are Edges of Joy,
Words of Comfort and Hope
Poems by A.E. Dozat © 2018
If you are in need of encouragement or know someone who does you should order a copy today, you will glad you did. 

Use the Buy Now button for quick check out

$9.62 Plus $4.17 Basic Shipping


For digital downloads CLICK HERE, $2.99.

To find out more and read a sample poem visit my website, A.E. Dozat.com.

To read a review CLICK HERE.

© A.E.Dozat 6/7/18

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

The Author Explains His Poem, Joy's Birthing,

The poem, Joys Birthing, gives hope that God is available and listening to our prayers for help. I wrote it with the hope that others will be inspired to turn to the Lord God in their desperate hour. It is in my book of poems, Beyond These Dark Lands Are Edges of Joy, Words of Comfort And Hope.

TITLE
The title focuses on the beginning of joy, and it makes you consider how joy starts in your life. It may seem redundant to use both the word, "birthing" and the phrase, "starting point," but a birth must have a starting point. I hoped the title would create interest so you would read the poem to see how you can start finding joy.

STRUCTURE
All the poems in this book look like free verse, but I use some structure to give them a flow. In this poem, the majority of the lines are five syllables long except for some that are shortened for emphasis. The first nine lines make a declaration that
"Joy
Is born in the muck
Of the lowly heart."
Lines 10 through 19 turns the poem to God who
"...Hears the cry
Illustration for the Poem Joy's birthing
From The Book,
Beyond These Dark Lands
Are Edges of Joy
© A.E. Dozat 2018
Of the broken and
The helpless ones."
The final section lines 20 through 28, brings God and the humble man together saying that,
"God rewards their plea
And does for them
What they can't do..."
The four syllable couplet is shorter than the lines before it, this gives it emphasis. The last lines are a celebration of God's generosity of provision.

MEANING
The poem not only says that you can begin to have joy; but that God is the source of your joy if you will be humble to admit your need and come to him.

ILLUSTRATION
The illustration is a road winding through grassy hills and beside the road is a sheep to illustrate the humility needed to come to God.

SCRIPTURE
The footnote to the poem is the scripture, "Humble yourselves before the Lord and He will lift you up." James 4:10

This poem gives hope to anybody that joy and God's grace is available to all- no matter how downtrodden they are.  You can read it in its entirety when you order your copy, use the button below.


Beyond These Dark Lands
Are Edges of Joy,
Words of Comfort and Hope
Poems by A.E. Dozat © 2018
If you are in need of encouragement or know someone who does you should order a copy today, you will glad you did. 

Use the Buy Now button for quick check out

$9.62 Plus $4.17 Basic Shipping


For digital downloads CLICK HERE, $2.99.

To find out more and read a sample poem visit my website, A.E. Dozat.com.
To read a review CLICK HERE.

© AE.Dozat 5/29/18

Sunday, May 20, 2018

What Did the Author Mean in His Poem, The Perspective?

What is the poem, The Perspective, about? It is not a very complicated poem and has a simple message that anyone can appreciate, a message that points us to God.

I wrote it to help people consider how they relate to God during their struggles. I hope it helps them to see God in a larger way.

THE TITLE
What does the title have to do with the poem?  A perspective is a point of view or point of reference used to relate one against another.  The subtitle, "A Poem about the Measure," is the clue that explains the poem. It challenges you to question your focus.

STRUCTURE
Illustration for Poem, Perspective
From the book of poems
Beyond These Dark Lands
© A.E. Dozat 2018 
It looks like free-verse, and it is even less structured than most of my poems because it is built on a popular saying that you see online often. I did not overwork it because I thought it would look like a pretentious couching of a simple saying.

This poem is very blunt and to compensate it I wrote it in a soft voice using "we" and "our" instead of "you" and "your."

It starts out with the struggle:
"We all face a Goliath"
And
"We flail at him with 
Puny weapons,"
Then we start to get to the point at line 10,
"We rush to tell God
That this demon
Is just too big..."
The last three lines wrap everything up with a declaration of the greatness of God.

WHAT IT MEANS
When you get the book and read this poem, you will quickly see the message that we focus too much on our problems, and do not see God as big enough to conquer them.

This poem is illustrated with a road that leads to distant mountains which rise out of the mist, in the center of the road is a rock that is insufficient compared to the mountain.

When you read this poem, you will be gently encouraged by the message that God's power is available to you in your battles.

Beyond These Dark Lands
Are Edges of Joy,
Words of Comfort and Hope
Poems by A.E. Dozat © 2018
This is a good gift to give someone who is going through a difficult time. If you are in need of encouragement or know someone who does you should order a copy today, you will glad you did. 

Use the Buy Now button for quick check out

$9.62 Plus $4.17 Basic Shipping


For digital downloads (PDF)  CLICK HERE.  $2.99.

To find out more and read a sample poem visit my website, A.E. Dozat.com.

To read a review CLICK HERE.

© Adron 5/20/18

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

The Author Explains His Poem, Circumstances Not, A Poem of the Reason

What is the poem, Circumstances Not, about? It has several meanings and more than one interpretation.

WHY I WROTE THIS POEM
I wrote this poem to encourage people who are suffering. It says that in time they can choose to rejoice. It was inspired by the scripture in which the Apostle commands Christians to rejoice. The wording of the scripture is woven into the poem.

WHAT DOES THE POEM'S TITLE MEAN?
Illustration for the Poem, Circumstances Not,
A Poem of the Reason,
From The book, Beyond These Dark Lands are
Edges of Joy
©A.E. Dozat 2018
In this book, all the titles are in two parts. The title, "Circumstances Not," is vague on purpose, it could be a negative statement about circumstances or a denial of the effects of circumstances or the poem is not about the circumstances at all. The subtitle, "A poem of the Reason," is close to the main point of the poem that we are looking beyond our circumstances to something else.

HOW IS THIS POEM ARRANGED?
This poem is 17 lines totaling 78 words arranged as free-verse but not without structure.

Lines 1 through 13 all use the same pattern of a word "Rejoice!" and followed by an example of the persecution the Apostle experienced.
Line 14 is a summery exclamation, "So, yes, rejoice!" 

The last three lines explain why in all these situations we can rejoice.

A reader who is familiar with the scripture, Philippians 4:4, will recognize a pattern in the poem that reflects the scripture.

WHAT IS THE MEANING OF THIS POEM
The last two lines tell us that we can find a reason for joy. Our joy is in someone who is greater than circumstances.
"...because of Him
Who Is Above All Things."


HOW IS IT ILLUSTRATED
I continued the theme of a road. In this illustration, the road is a wooden walkway over a marsh, but the planks are askew or absent in places so the walk hazardous. It is to show a difficult circumstance. There is hope because the sun shines beyond distant hills.

This poem fills an important place in this book about finding joy and hope. This poem encourages you by showing the Apostle Paul's joy in spite of his circumstances.

THE SCRIPTURE
The footnote on the page is the scripture, "Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice!" Philippians 4:4, NIV.

You can read the poem on page 14 of my book Beyond These Dark Lands Are Edges of Joy.

Beyond These Dark Lands 
Are Edges of Joy,
Words of Comfort and Hope
Poems by A.E. Dozat © 2018
Here is a good gift to give someone who is going through a difficult time. If you are in need of encouragement or know someone who does you should order a copy today, you will glad you did. 

Use the Buy Now button for quick check out

$9.62 Plus $4.17 Basic Shipping


For digital download CLICK HERE, $2.99.
To find out more and read a sample poem visit my website, A.E. Dozat.com.
To read a review CLICK HERE.

© Adron 5/6/18

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

The Author Explains His Poem, Patience, A Poem of Him Who Watches

PATIENCE, A Poem of Him Who Watches, is found on page 13 of my Book, Beyond These Dark Lands Are Edges of Joy, Words of Comfort and Hope.

I wrote this poem as encouragement for those who feel that they are going through a long time of hardship.

TITLE
The title is two-sided. At first, it could be that we are going through the dark time and must be patient, but, the subtitle, A Poem of Him Who Watches, might be about how God watches over us through our long night, or that we are watching for deliverance through the night. This open-ended title starts the reader thinking right from the beginning.

STRUCTURE
The poem is 26 lines long with grouped rhythms to speed up or slow down the reader. The first nine lines are the opening statement. Lines 1-6 are all short and move quickly, followed by two lines of both five syllables then line 9 is six syllables. The opening combines not only place and time but also experience.
"Those who have lived
only
Illustration for the Poem, Patience,
A Poem of Him Who Watches.
From the Book,
Beyond These Dark Lands are Edges of Joy
© A.E. Dozat 2018
under the cold stars..."

Faith is explored in lines 10 to 19, They vary in length between four or five syllables
"Faith knows the sun
will certainly rise..."

Lines 20 through 22 talks about the comfort of faith that is based on truth.

The poem concludes in lines 23 through 26 by declaring that our patient faith proves our love for God.

MEANING
The metaphor of the stars makes us face eternity with a sense of our smallness and ignorance of what is beyond our place and time. But faith hopes for the dawn and watches in that hope because we know our patient waiting is evidence of our faith in God who is also watching over us.

ILLUSTRATION
The poem is illustrated with a pen drawing of a road leading to the sunrise.

THE LESSON THIS POEM TEACHES
Our lives are a living statement. How we react to suffering speaks to others. This poem helps people see that their reaction to trials must come from a mature thought-out faith. It shows the purpose of enduring through hardship.

There are many reasons and explanations for our suffering and no one answer suffices for all, but this poem says that our enduring faith in God during hardships proves our love for God.

The poem is accompanied by this scripture:
“However, as it is written: ‘What no eye has seen, what no ear has heard, and what no human mind has conceived’ -- the things God has prepared for those who love Him.” 1 Corinthians 2:9, NIV.


Beyond These Dark Lands Are Edges of Joy,
Words of Comfort and Hope
Poems by A.E. Dozat © 2018
If you are in need of encouragement or know someone who does you should order a copy today, you will glad you did. 

Use the Buy Now button for quick check out

$9.62 Plus $4.17 Basic Shipping


For large orders or digital downloads follow this link to TheBookPatch, my print on demand partner.

To find out more and read a sample poem visit my website, A.E. Dozat.com.

To read a review CLICK HERE.

To read a review CLICK HERE.

© Adron 5/2/18